THE iKiFit BLOG

Join iKiFit founder, Kim Macrae for thought provoking snippets about education, life choices, self empowerment and reflection, that encourage us to be the best version of ourselves - Every Single Day in lots of little ways! Watch a brief introduction to the blog below

Blog Introduction Blog Introduction (101332 KB)


(Click below to hear iKi Crews Every Single Day excerpt, full version for sale on iTunes).

Life Coach and fulltime working Mum of 3, Amy shares her experiences of how iKi helps her meet the challenges of juggling children, partner and career while striving to be a happy, healthy strong role model. And staying sane!.

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BUY THE 'EVERY SINGLE DAY' SINGLE HERE

Learning resilience.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Resilience is a matter of habit

Firstly, a big thanks to my regular readers. As you’re aware, each weeks’ blog is around a word from the song “Every Single Day” which mentions some of the many ways we can make each day a little better.

In this weeks’ blog I’m taking a break from that format but sticking to the theme.

I’ve just finished reading Joe Williams’ new book “Defying the Enemy Within” and was amazed at the number of great adjectives that can be applied to it.

The book is a great read, fast paced and engrossing. Joe outlines his childhood with humor and humility and shares the excitement, the ups and downs of his impressive sporting career. He is articulate, honest and humble.

He deals with his substance abuse and mental health issues openly and bravely and takes us on an involving journey to where he is now – making a powerful, positive contribution to all Australians. His advice on how he stays positive, healthy and highly functional is clear, inspirational and truly helpful.

His comments that the Australian nation as a whole can learn much from the First Nations, if we will just listen, is visionary and timely.

Great job Joe. I’m proud to be a friend and fellow Australian.

Kim


 


7. Clean your plate.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Clean your plate

Opinions differ about whether it’s best to eat everything on our plates or to stop when we’ve had enough. Some say that eating all the food put in front of us can make us obsessive or encourage overeating.

However, I grew up on a farm with 4 brothers and subscribe firmly to eating everything I am served. I think it’s a principle that we can apply to most areas of our lives – i.e to learn to manage ourselves, set achievable goals and to finish what we set out to do.

Serving up a healthy portion at each meal and finishing what’s there is a way of learning to take responsibility for ourselves and our decisions – and to complete what we start.

If you are trying to cut down on your calorie intake, just eat from a smaller plate. There’s lots of psychology in eating, as in everything else, and when you see you’ve finished what’s on your plate, you know you've had enough. It's about making the right choices in the first place.

Learn what and how much is right for us, be satisfied with what we choose and tidy up after ourselves. Clean our plate.

Job well done every time.

 

 


6. Investigate

Tuesday, February 06, 2018

“But why Mum?” That nagging question can be annoying but is part of developing – and maintaining - a healthy mind. Encouraging children to explore and investigate doesn’t just help set them up for a rewarding life, it can help extend the quality and length of life as well. And it applies to people of all ages, so don’t be afraid to go along for the ride.

Lots of research – as well as common sense - tells us that the best way to stay young is to act the way young people do.
Stay curious, investigate, keep learning, be interested, be involved, join in.
Practise and model the good behaviours of young people.

If the tap won’t stop dripping, have a look and see if you can fix it. It might be easier than you thought. Or it may challenge you in such a way that you develop a whole new set of skills.

And being interested is a great way to strengthen family bonds. Try asking these two questions over dinner with your family:
1. What was the best thing that happened to you today?
2. If you could, what would you like to change about today?
This way, you’ll learn more about what the ones you love are doing and what makes them happy or sad.
Also, you might find out about an issue like playground bullying before it gets out of control.

We’re never too young or old to learn, in fact when we stop learning we get old in a bad way.
Curiosity may occasionally kill the cat ---but much more often it prolongs and improves life.

Have an awesome week, 

Kim.